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BIOGRAPHY

Bráulio Alves de Oliveira was born in Sacramento, Minas Gerais, Brazil, on 1 September 1892. His parents were Francisco Alves de Oliveira and Valeriana Maria de Jesus, and he had five siblings: Abilio, Isildra, Watersides, Maria Alves and Maria Vicencia. His father was apolitical and irreligious, while his older brother, Abílio, was very studious and soon became interested in Spiritism after its first arrival in Sacramento. He began his studies at the age of eight, where he was taught how to read by a teacher named José da Costa. He then studied for another two years under his brother, Abilio, who was also a teacher.

In his youth, between 1910 and 1915, he was a disciple of Eurípedes Barsanulfo, a Brazilian educator who is known as the founder and first headmaster of Colégio Allan Kardec, one of the first spiritist schools in the world. He had previously resided on his father’s farm, approximately 7 kilometers from Sacramento. In 1910, his father sent him to the city for the studies. During the first year, he stayed at the home of a Portuguese man, Manoel de Oliveira, who was both a businessman and a family friend. Eventually, his father sold the farm and purchased some houses in the city, prompting him to return and live with his family. In the higher education course that Barsanulfo taught, among the classes were Portuguese, French, astronomy, and geometry. According to Alves de Oliveira, all these subjects were valuable because he didn’t merely focus on the content of the books. According to him, the most significant lesson he learned was that people must comprehend the mission each individual has, and that one should serve rather than expect to be served.

As a Spiritist, he mentioned that he didn’t engage in incorporation mediumship. Barsanulfo assigned him the task of caring for the obsessed individuals who stayed at the College, arriving from various places seeking treatment. There were consistently six to eight individuals lodging at the College, and he continued this duty for approximately three years. He worked as a teacher in rural areas, having been hired by several farmers to instruct their children in their first lessons. He taught in Santa Maria, where he encountered the prominent Spiritist leader Mariano da Cunha, who was Barsanulfo’s uncle. Because of his frequent travels, Bráulio was unable to become more directly involved in the Spiritist movement in Sacramento.

On 27 July 1918, at the age of 25, he married Antonia Barbosa Nunes. The couple had three children. From his second marriage, with a woman named Almerinda, thirteen more were born. He had various jobs throughout his life, including roles as a teacher, bookkeeper, clerk, notary, and carpenter.

As a centenarian, he reportedly had 18 grandchildren, 35 great-grandchildren and 7 great-great-grandchildren.

Bráulio Alves de Oliveira passed away in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil, on 29 May 2003, at the age of 110 years, 270 days.

RECOGNITION

His age was verified by Stefan Maglov and Filipe Lopes, and listed as pending validation by the LAS as of 3 September 2022.

GALLERY

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