Japanese Hana Satō (1914-Present) Validated as Supercentenarian
Japanese Hana Satō (1914-Present) Validated as Supercentenarian
American Florilla Ames (1911-2011) Validated as Supercentenarian
American Florilla Ames (1911-2011) Validated as Supercentenarian
Japanese Asakichi Okada (1906-2016) Validated as Supercentenarian
Japanese Asakichi Okada (1906-2016) Validated as Supercentenarian
Japanese Asahiko Iwasaki (1908-2018) Validated as Supercentenarian
Japanese Asahiko Iwasaki (1908-2018) Validated as Supercentenarian
American Elsie Martin (1910-2022) Validated as Supercentenarian
American Elsie Martin (1910-2022) Validated as Supercentenarian
previous arrow
next arrow
Translate:

BIOGRAPHY

Katsuko Tago was born in Ōmachi, Nagano Prefecture, Japan, on 28 March 1910, as the eldest of 10 siblings. Following her graduation from a girls’ high school, she assisted her father in running a kimono shop for several years before relocating to Tokyo. In Tokyo, she married a banker, thanks to an introduction from her uncle, a professor at an art university in the city. The couple went on to have seven children, and Tago played the role of a supportive housewife while her husband pursued a career as a bank branch manager.

Until she was around 90 years old, she regularly attended a doll-making class in her hometown in Nagano every month. She continued her creative pursuits until she was around 103, focusing on crafting Kimekomi dolls and even carving wooden objects like skunk cabbage. Around the age of 103, she suffered a femur fracture and underwent surgery. With the help of rehabilitation, she regained her ability to walk. However, two years later, she experienced another fracture and began receiving care in a nursing home.

Before moving into the nursing home, she had dealt with diabetes and high blood pressure, but with proper healthcare at the facility, her health improved. Up until the age of about 110, she remained in close contact with her family, sharing details of life at the nursing home. At the age of 113, she occasionally engaged in activities like folding laundry alongside other residents and managed to maneuver her wheelchair to the cafeteria to enjoy her meals. She attributed her long life to her daily practice of enjoying strawberry-flavored chocolate. Her family believed that her determination and independent thinking were also contributing factors to her longevity.

Katsuko Tago passed away on December 1, 2023 at the age of 113 years and 248 days.

RECOGNITION

Her age was verified by Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MHLW), as well as Yumi Yamamoto and Masamichi Tago, and validated by LongeviQuest on 8 October 2023.

ATTRIBUTION

(All the information regarding Katsuko Tago’s biography was gathered through interviews conducted by LongeviQuest with her family.)

GALLERY

Recommended