Hans Schornack was a validated German supercentenarian who died in 2023 at the age of 110. Schornack was the oldest living man in Germany for over two years, as well as in Europe for seven months. He also holds the record for the oldest person ever born on leap day.

Schornack was born in Essen, located in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, on 29 February 1912. He had a lifelong love for cars, becoming a mechanic and later running his own car dealership. After the war, Schornack sold tobacco along with his brother. Still driving at 95, he lived independently until 104, attributing his long life to moderation, positivity, good deeds, and strong connections. He received the COVID-19 vaccine in January 2021, and later recovered from a mild case of the virus, making him one of its oldest survivors.

Schornack on his 109th birthday (Source: GSE)

Schornack passed away on 22 February 2023, at the age of 110 years, 358 days. Upon his passing, he was succeeded by André Ludwig as Europe’s oldest living man, and by Karlheinz Stauber as Germany’s oldest living man.

On 24 June 2020, Schornack became the oldest living man in Germany at the age of 108 following the passing of 109-year-old Heinrich Homann. He became the oldest living man in Europe on 15 July 2022 following the passing of 111-year-old Frenchman André Boite.

On 13 September 2022, at the age of 110 years, 196 days, he surpassed the final age of Mary Norris (1892–2002) and became the oldest person ever born on 29 February.

LongeviQuest congratulates Hans Schornack’s family on his posthumous recognition.

For more information, please view Mr. Schornack’s Directory Profile here.

Annemarie Zander was a validated German supercentenarian who died in 2023 at the age of 110. As a supercentenarian, she lived in Trier and was the oldest resident of Rhineland-Palatinate.

Annemarie Zander was born as Anna Maria Propson in Pallien, a suburb of Trier in the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate, on 12 May 1913. She was a curious child and always asked questions about history to her father and grandfather. Zander was a wife and a mother to 1 child.

Zander’s early life was marked by a bomb attack in her hometown in 1917, followed by resistance against the French. Though she witnessed historical events like President Hindenburg’s visit in 1930 and passed her garden design exam in 1933, she worked as a secretary and payroll clerk until the end of World War II. Choosing not to evacuate Trier during the air raids, she later expressed surprise at her own survival.

After her retirement, Zander devoted herself to her hobbies, which included history and family research. She did a lot of research in local archives and supported her husband in the production of the New Trier Yearbook published by the Trierisch Association.

Zander on her 109th birthday (Source: Stadt Trier)

At the time of her 109th birthday, along with her daughter, Zander had three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She died on 12 December 2023 at the age of 110 years, 214 days.

LongeviQuest congratulates Annemarie Zander’s family on her posthumous recognition.

For more information, please view Mrs. Zander’s Directory Profile here.

LongeviQuest is delighted to announce that Germany’s second oldest living person turned 113. Erna Brosig’s celebrated her birthday at the Ansgarhaus Senior Center with her family and friends. While struggling with health challenges, Brosig still shared her longevity secret: a diet of fresh, homemade food, punctuated by the occasional digestive schnapps. Currently, Brosig is the oldest known living person in Lower Saxony. The European Supercentenarian Organisation (ESO) has also validated her age.

Brosig at the age of 108.
(Source: GRG)

Erna Brosig was born in Breslau, Silesia, Germany (now Wroclaw, Poland) on 15 January 1911. During World War II, she fled to Dresden, then moved to Bavaria and, finally, to Munster, where she and her husband lived for 20 years until 1977.

Since 1977, Brosig has called a large apartment complex in Hannover home, with a brief five-year break in an elderly facility that didn’t suit her. Remarkably, she received the COVID-19 vaccine at 110 and celebrated her birthday the next day.

 

 

LongeviQuest is delighted to announce that as of December 22, 2023, the age of Mrs. Charlotte Kretschmann, who currently holds the record as the oldest person ever to have lived in Germany, has been officially validated.

Kretschmann was born in Wrocław, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland (then part of the German Empire), on December 3, 1909. During her time in Poland, she married Werner Kretschmann, and together they had a daughter. When the Second World War erupted, her husband was deployed to France as a soldier, while she fled westward with their daughter. After the war, the couple was happily reunited. Mrs. Kretschmann outlived both her husband and daughter and currently resides in a nursing home in Kirchheim unter Teck, where she is regularly visited by her grandsons.

On August 8, 2023, she surpassed Josefine Ollmann’s final age, becoming Germany’s oldest woman ever. Then, on December 10, 2023, at the age of 114 years and 7 days, she surpassed the final age of an unvalidated claimant, Gustav Gerneth, securing her position as the undisputed oldest person to have ever lived in Germany.

Mrs. Kretschmann’s age has been validated through collaboration between LongeviQuest and the European Supercentenarian Organisation (ESO). We wish to convey our gratitude to the researchers and extend congratulations to her and her family for this recognition.

LongeviQuest is delighted to announce that Germany’s oldest person ever turned 114 years old. Charlotte Kretschmann celebrated her milestone surrounded by friends and family on 3 December 2023. She holds the record as the oldest person ever to have resided in Germany.

Charlotte Kretschmann’s 114th birthday celebration
(Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/C0ZdW0Kr_d2/)

Charlotte Kretschmann was born in Wrocław, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland (then German Empire) on 3 December 1909. She developed a passion for athletics during her youth. Through her involvement in an athletics club, she met her future husband. They married and had a daughter. With the outbreak of World War II, her husband was deployed to France as a soldier, while Kretschmann sought refuge westward with their daughter. Following the war’s end, the Red Cross facilitated the couple’s reunion, and they settled in Stuttgart.

Kretschmann maintained her independence well into her centennial years. However, in 2014, after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage, she transitioned to a nursing home. Despite her advanced age, Kretschmann remained an avid reader, enjoyed a glass of red wine with her meals, and had a sweet tooth for chocolate. She attributes her longevity to a combination of vigorous exercise (even during winter) and a happy childhood.

Kretschmann became the oldest living person in Germany on 18 September 2022, following the death of 113-year-old Anna Cernohorsky. On 8 February 2023, following the death of Maria Aulenbacher of South Carolina, USA, Kretschmann became the oldest living German person in the world. On 8 August 2023, she surpassed the final age of Josefine Ollmann, becoming the oldest person to ever live in Germany.

For more information, please view Kretschmann’s Directory Profile here.